Woman sitting on a chair

Are the people in your team ready for change, or do they typically resist change?

People who resist

People who resist generally don’t handle change well and tend to see it as a threat.  They avoid it as much as possible, worried it will introduce things they don’t want to face.

Basically, they fear change. This is driven by a sense of insecurity about their capacity, and they have memories and stories of how and when change went bad.  Whenever something looks like changing,they begin to panic and the negative stories start circulating. Not good.

Resistance soon turns to blame.  Employees are blamed for not being ‘team players’, and they in turn blame management for not understanding or appreciating them.  Blame leads to animosity, loss of trust, and a damaged culture.

People who are ready

But when people are ready for change they see change as an opportunity to grow and improve.  They are optimistic about change and have a sense of confidence about the organisation’s ability to adapt and grow.  People are  flexible in their thinking and acting.  There is a focus on building strengths.

When change readiness is present, there is less resistance and more engagement.  Conversations display confidence in the organisation rather than fear.  People’s achievements are celebrated; blaming is rare.  Teamwork is high, engagement is high, and leadership is proactive.

Goes to the heart

Organisations are not resistant simply because a few people resist change, nor are they ready because a few people are ready.  Their resistance or readiness goes to the heart of the organisation, permeating its culture and climate. Changing a change-resistant organisation does not happen by running one or two workshops. It takes a concerted effort that addresses deep and entrenched issues.

If your organisation is not ready for change, we have programs to help you. Contact us for more information.

Dr Steve Barlow